It was an extraordinary assignment about Eugene’s craft beer scene for the award-winning Latitudes magazine. The story was written by Portland’s very own Annelise Kelly. My assignment began in one of the most picturesque spots of the McKenzie River headwaters. Essentially, this is where Eugene craftsmen’s passion for water and hops begins.

photo of McKenzie River in its headwaters

McKenzie River headwaters, Oregon
© Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved.

 

From there, I was on for wonderful discoveries of kindhearted people and the culinary environment that they created and continue to bestow and nurture.

photo of pizza in the oven; Oregon Wood-Fired Pizza

Oregon Wood Fired Pizza; Eugene, Oregon
© Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved.

 

photo of publication in Latitudes magazine, January 2014 issue

Tear sheets | Latitudes magazine January 2014 Issue

More to come …

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American Forests Magazine features my work & interview in their Fall 2013 printed and web editions. http://www.americanforests.org/magazine/article/close-up-with-nature-photographer-tatiana-boyle/

American Forests, Fall 2013 issue | tear sheet

Tear sheet | American Forests, Fall 2013 Issue

More to come …

This has been a wonderful journey season — many re-discoveries, some new visits, and discoveries of a culinary class.

There are hundreds of ways in which ordinary potatoes are prepared around the world. But the most recent revelation happened in Badenweiler, Germany on a gleaming-sunny afternoon. These fried potatoes re-created the long-time coveted taste of the acutely fresh produce. I attributed that wonderful flavor to the brilliance of the mineral-rich Schwarzwald’s waters.

Lunch plate in Badenweiler, Germany | © Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved. No copying, distribution, publishing without Terms of Use (TOS).

Lunch plate in Badenweiler, Germany | © Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved.

The routes such as Russia’s Trans-Siberian train trip are among a few in a steady and highly functional operation around the world. I was only ten when I stepped inside a big Russian passenger railcar for the first time  and the novelty of the occurrence never wears off. From the first greeting phrases of the train conductor to a tea service with its enigmatic “podstakanniks”, Trans-Siberian is a guaranteed sustainability of views, characters, sounds, and rituals. A myriad of processes make the journey new. While imagery has its place in registering the novelty of an event, it can stand-in only to a degree for a sense of actual presence. Trans-continental railways are not made anymore and remaining well-serviced multiple-day railway routes steadily diminish world-wide.

Train machinist, Trans-Siberian railway; Russia | © Tatiana Boyle. No copying, distribution, publishing without Terms of Use (ToS).

Train machinist, Trans-Siberian railway; Russia | © Tatiana Boyle.

Central train station, Trans-Siberian railway; Khabarovsk, Russia | © Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved. No copying, distribution, publishing without Terms of Use (ToS).

Central train station, Trans-Siberian railway; Khabarovsk, Russia | © Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved.

Sydney’s Circular Quay can be the place to lift up your feet or mingle leisurely after the deep cradle of Siberian valleys. It is energetic but in a specifically Aussie’s way — busy and laid-back. It carries away a visitor in its particular rhythm signaling that while there is much to see and experience, there will be time for reflection, discovery, and adventure.

Circular Quay; Sydney, Australia | © Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved. No copying, distribution, publishing without Terms of Use (ToS).

Circular Quay; Sydney, Australia | © Tatiana Boyle. All rights reserved.

More to come …